Politics and environmental conservation

Whatever your views on the UK’s membership of the EU, it has to be said that there have been some landmark ECJ cases which are down to the Habitats Directive, the Aarhus Convention and the like.  Would those same victories have been secured in the UK courts?  It was thanks to the requirements of the Habitats Directive that the future of Thorne and Hatfield Moors SSSI, also Natura 2000 sites were secured.  That is not to say they are not still threatened but they are in theory better protected.

 

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There have been a number of reviews over the last couple of years which have seen erosion of protection of Sites of Special Scientific Interest.  In March 2012 the UK Government published its Report of the Habitats and Wild Birds Directives Implementation Review.

The Forum made a submission  to the subsequent consultation as did many environmental organisations.

Then in February 2013 there followed the Triennial Review of the Environment Agency and Natural England, this is seen by some as a variation on the aftermath of 1997 when the statutory protection agency was dubbed a “Muzzled Watchdog” as English Nature morphed into Natural England.  What will be the outcome of this latest review, the muzzle has been removed but are they now toothless?  See Mark Avery’s guest blog for 17 January if you think theat Defra agencies are effective.  See also A Summary of Stakeholders Views to try to work out what future for statutory environmental protection.  Another excellent erudite analysis by Carol Day is to be found in another of Mark’s guest blogs under “The UK and Environmental democracy – the Aarhus end of nowhere?” 

So, whilst there is much to concern us about EU membership, by leaving in a headlong fashion without first ensuring that the environment is not completely “culled” from the agenda, consider the salutory offerings of Friends of the Earth, who issued a recent press release, in it they suggest that ….

Abandoning UK membership of  the EU, or even a partial withdrawal, would pose a significant threat to our environment, Friends of the Earth warns today (Tuesday 14 May 2013).

A new Friends of the Earth briefing, published today, the Implications for UK Environmental Policy of a Vote to Exit the EU, written by Dr Charlotte Burns of the University of York – an expert in European Union environment policy and processes – says:

· UK membership of the EU has led to cleaner drinking water, cleaner bathing beaches and cleaner air and better protection of our wildlife;

· Frequent attempts by UK ministers to weaken progressive environmental policy at the European level suggests that there will be a weakening of the nation’s environmental policy if we are not subject to EU rules;

· A partial EU withdrawal (membership of the free-trade zone), the most popular option in recent poll of Conservative members earlier, would leave the UK covered by most EU environmental laws (which the UK would have no influence over) – but not all. For example the UK would not be covered by the Birds Directive, Bathing Waters Directive and the Habitats Directive.

Friends of  the Earth’s Policy and Campaigns Director Craig Bennett said:

“UK withdrawal from the EU – partially or completely – could have an enormous  impact on our green and pleasant land.

“Our membership has led to cleaner drinking water, beaches and air and better protection for our wildlife.

“If we want to avoid a return to our reputation as the dirty man of Europe we must stay in the EU.”

Remember the words of Edmund Burke who offered that “Nobody made a greater mistake than he who did nothing because he could only do a little”, factor in the rise of the internet tools such as online petitions and campaign blogs and you begin to contemplate the power of the collective ….

 

 

 

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