Masses of moths & moth-ers on T’Moors

It wasn’t perfect weather for mothing , but the date had been set and nothing short of a deluge was going to stop an evening spent on the periphery of Thorne Moors trying to add new data to our ever burgeoning catalogue.

Despite being a cool star-lit night reasonable numbers of moths visited a series of lights across Thorne Moors. Image: Simon & Karen Spavin

Despite being a cool star-lit night reasonable numbers of moths visited a series of lights across Thorne Moors.
Image: Simon & Karen Spavin

Interesting species recorded included Beautiful Hook-tip (72.069) Laspeyria flexula, described as a mainly southern species in the literature and first recorded from Thorne Moors in 2012.

Other species recorded included Round-winged Muslin (72.037) and Four-dotted Footman (72.038), both described in the literature as ‘local’ species and uncommon.

Cybosia mesomella Four-dotted Footman (72.038) At least four specimens to Actinic trap. Image: Simon & Karen Spavin

Cybosia mesomella Four-dotted Footman (72.038)
At least four specimens to Actinic trap.
Image: Simon & Karen Spavin

Four Ghost Moths, one male in the company of three females all of clearly differing dimensions.

Hepialus humuli Ghost Moth (3.005), one of three females in the company of a single male at MV light. Image: Simon & Karen Spavin

Hepialus humuli Ghost Moth (3.005), one of three females in the company of a single male at MV light.
Image: Simon & Karen Spavin

A Garden Tiger was a nice moth and to some extent unexpected, but a welcome emergence from one of the Actinic traps as they were emptied around 1am.

Arctia caja Garden Tiger (72.026) Image: Simon & Karen Spavin

Arctia caja Garden Tiger (72.026)
Image: Simon & Karen Spavin

Supporting cast included Brimstone, Blackneck, Scarce Footman, Elephant and Poplar Hawkmoths, Large Emerald, Miller, Coxcomb Prominent, Peppered Moth, Lackey & Drinker amongst others.

Opisthographis luteolata Brimstone Moth (70.226). Image: Simon & Karen Spavin

Opisthographis luteolata Brimstone Moth (70.226).
Image: Simon & Karen Spavin

There was relative quiet, background hum of the generator excepted but the amount of light pollution was really apparent, this despite a distant tree line and hedgerow.

Two other records of interest for the evening were Barn Owl as we arrived on site and a Violet Ground Beetle (Carabus violaceus) sauntering around the sheet of one of the MV lights.  There were of course the usual hordes of mosquitoes but not in the usual vast swathes and of no consequence with an enjoyable evening amongst fellow mothing enthusiasts.

 

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