Floods and related matters & ‘moor’ invitations ….

A fabulous couple of days, on Friday 31 July the Forum network and visitors gathered in Crowle to hear a series of presentations by three well qualified speakers on wetland related topics offer thought provoking challenges.

“The Flood Untamed” was organised to celebrate Purseglove’s updating of his seminal work “Taming of the Flood” and the event which saw our return to Crowle Community Hall where ten years previously we held the first in the series of the Stephen W Warburton Memorial Lectures and where Jeremy had joined us to reflect on the loss of the ‘guardian of the Yorkshire landscape’ was well received if the feedback has been anything to go by.

We were treated to some thought provoking questions around water management and engineered vs softer more natural options particularly in floodplain areas.  With all three speakers offering well illustrated case studies from across the globe as well as a local perspective which included reports from Sheffield and Hull as well as the Doncaster area.

Dr Paul C Buckland spoke on Floodplains and the fossil record: What should we be aiming for? and Prof Ian D Rotherham provided graphic illustrations to accompany Here comes the flood.  Surprised?  How history should inform future water management.

This aberrant Gatekeeper was located on Thorne Moors whilst a Crowle audience listened to the possibility of increased flood events.  Image: Martin WArne.

This aberrant Gatekeeper was located on Thorne Moors whilst a Crowle audience listened to the possibility of increased flood events. Image: Martin Warne.

The following day – a delicious picnic which included home made shortbread and freshly picked  ‘Napoleon’ cherries – what better way to enjoy Yorkshire Day than in the company of delightful companions on the wonderful wetland wilderness of Thorne Moors which we accessed via Crowle Moors.  Marsh Harriers, Buzzards and the squeal of a hidden Water Rail amidst wetland vegetation along with the expected assemblage of sun loving butterflies in the drier areas along with a number of day flying moths including a Beautiful Hook-tip.  Damsels and Dragons too were numberous with aeshna, sympetrum, coenagrion and enallagma species represented.

Hidden gems amongst the juncus and other wetland vegetation. Image: Patrick Wildgust.

Hidden gems amongst the juncus and other wetland vegetation.
Image: Patrick Wildgust.

If readers are minded to consider experiencing the wetland for the first time or indeed for a ‘moor’ detailed look then why not come along on Monday 10 August and mingle on the mire with knowledable experts?

An Introduction to Wildflowers and Wildlife of a Peat Bog will take place on Thorne Moors.

The event is free but places are limited and pre-booking is essential. Please email info@hallamec.plus.com or telephone 0114 272 4227 or execsec@thmcf.org for more information or to reserve a place.

The event is with the Thorne & Hatfield Moors Conservation Forum, JBA Consulting Ltd., the British Ecological Society Peatland Group, Sheffield Hallam University, and South Yorkshire Biodiversity Research Group.

This is a unique chance to see the magnificent and expansive Thorne Moors – one of the most remarkable wildlife sites in Britain and one of Europe’s biggest restoration projects for nature conservation. No prior knowledge is required and this event is suitable for beginners wanting to see the Moors and find out about the special flowers, which grow there.We expect to see plenty of other wildlife too.

We will depart from the Delves Café car park at 10.45 am by minibus and return for 3 pm. Bring a packed lunch and drinks, plus suitable outdoor clothing. Use sunbloc if the weather is good and anti-insect ointment or sprays are recommended.

Come on, get out there and experience the magic before it is lost, before it ‘morphs’ as projects seek to ‘develop its potential’ ….

 

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