Posts Tagged ‘Ban driven grouse shooting epetition’

State of Nature,who cares? Calling conservation campaigners?

September 29, 2016

The natural environment and wildlife seems to have had its profile raised recently if the upsurge in epetitions is anything to go by?

We had the “Ban Driven Grouse Shooting” one which is now scheduled for oral evidence session in Westminster on 18 October (deadline for submitting written evidence 5 October).

butt%20henry

Henry needs our help still – have you written to your MP yet?  See here for useful tips.

Then Simon King launched “End the badger cull instead of expanding to new areas”, this petition is currently around 48,500 and has until 25 February 2017 to run, so it looks set to be another Westminster discussion.

Philippa Storey initiated “Suspend Natural England license to kill buzzards” currently around 13,350 with a deadline of 3 February 2017.

A lesser well known epetition was that launched by Zach Haynes “Protect UK Environment & Wildlife – adopt European environmental legislation” this will run until 6 January 2017.  Whatever our views of Brexit, I would like to think that readers of this blog are keen to see the natural environment and wildlife safeguarded, this petition recognises that “The vote to leave the EU could leave our wildlife at risk. The EU has developed a strong set of laws that protect the environment and our wildlife. As these laws will not apply when the UK leaves the EU we need new laws for the UK that give our precious wildlife and environment the same protection”.  Currently standing at around 5,750 signatures.

Wildlife champion and campaigner Chris Packham seeks to “Introduce a moratorium on the hunting of critically declining wading birds”this petition is scheduled to run until 23 March 2017 and currently has some 12,690 signatures.

“Woodcock, Snipe and Golden Plover are shot in the UK despite serious, ongoing population declines. A moratorium should be imposed to allow the impact of shooting to be established by independent scientific investigation and any necessary regulations introduced to ensure that shooting is sustainable.”

The State of Nature 2016 reports continuing decline in habitats and species in its usual almost apologetic way.  But just thinking over one’s own lifetime, the losses we mourn or at least those of us who can remember hedgerows, dew ponds, lapwing nests a plenty and flushing nightjars and woodcock from underfoot?  Where are the conservation champions?  Where are the challengers to the convention of constant compromise?  Should we just accept that development and private or corporate profits are more important than the natural environment?  If you subscribe to the notion that we all need clean air, clean water etc. then is it not incumbent upon us all to act responsibly, act with principles?  To engage, educate and empower others to help safeguard an environment which will still be there for future generations?  See also twitter.

Perhaps we might all consider signing the various ‘conservation’ petitions and then try to encourage others to do the same?  So, please share this blog blast amongst your network, family and friends.  Wildlife needs us today, tomorrow is too late and yesterday is like the Passenger Pigeon – gone!

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Nut job?

May 13, 2016

Yesterday we reported on habitat loss and failure to address by a number of public bodies.  Today we raise the issue of the behaviour of an MP, an elected public servant ….

Some readers may be aware that Chris Packham has written “Fingers in the Sparkle Jar”.  It is reviewed in the May issue of BBC Wildlife and  also features as BBC Radio 4’s Book of the Week.

Packham’s stance on the Hen Harrier issue is well known, it has gained him supporters and conversely it has attracted  abuse from some quarters.  Whilst campaigners might expect to attract criticism and to some extend verbal abuse, is it acceptable that a Member of Parliament ‘tweets’ in support?  To make matters worse, the MP in question is a Right Honourable  …. For more detailed background on the sorry story see Springwatch host Chris Packham branded “nut job” by hunting firm after Asperger admission.

Miles King and Mark Avery have both featured analysis of the slur on their respective blogs.  They are worth a read thus far and in all probability as they update the saga.

Bad enough that a business elects to use offensive terminology towards someone with opposing views to theirs, notably someone who is vehemently against illegal activities involving protected birds of prey.  But that an MP then supports their stance is quite out of order, MPs are reputedly public servants and it seems wholly reasonable that they behave in a courteous and polite manner?

An honourable gesture in light of the slur, which has the potential to offer more than Packham would be for ‘The Rt Hon’ Nicholas Soames to apologise?

Packham has responded and said: “It’s very disappointing to see such comments retweeted by an MP.  “People with Aspergers are not ‘nut jobs’ they are simply different.   Hunting Solutions and their supporter ‘The Rt Hon’ Sir Nicholas Soames MP clearly has a different opinion, and we are all entitled to opinions but the issue being is it right he uses such terminology given his public office?

We understand that attempts to contact him through social media were blocked, perhaps a polite note via email might persuade him to reconsider labeling people with Aspergers as nut jobs, and to apologise to Packham for inappropriate and offensive language?

End illegal persecution of protected species and manage the upland moors for public benefit?  Then ….

Ban driven grouse shooting

 

 

 

From Moth-athons to ‘Frack-athons’ & the Peak District Hen Harrier Day ….

July 28, 2014

The Thorne Moors ‘Moth-athon’ species list referred to in last nights blog post is slowly creeping nearer the target of 200, currently it stands at 177 species with two ‘stations’ still to have their data incorporated.

Clouded Border, one of the 177 species recorded so far on the 'moth-athon'.  Image: Steve Hiner.

Clouded Border, one of the 177 species recorded so far on the ‘moth-athon’. Image: Steve Hiner.

 

The state of English HEN HARRIERS

Another piece of good news is that Mark Avery’s epetition Ban driven grouse shooting is nearing his interim target of 10,000 as the ‘inglorious 12th’ approaches. It currently stands at 9,451 – can readers help him get it to that 10,000 target by the Hen Harrier Day scheduled for 10 August in the Peak District?  Chris Packham is attending the Peak District event, let’s hope for plenty of coverage in the press.  We hope the media do a decent job of reporting the rationale behind the event instead of playing politics with serious conservation issues which have been neglected for far too long.  If the industry can’t sort it’s own act out then it’s time that the people had a say and the politicians listened?

We will not repeat the various ‘arguments’ that Mark Avery and Chris Packham have used to justify the call for a ban, the series are better read via Standing up for nature, they make interesting reading as do some of the comments anonymous correspondents have submitted.  I understand that there is to be a ‘Thunderclap’ and the target, which is already exceeded, is to be a million signatures, but you can still join in see here for more about ‘Thunderclaps’.

So, if you’ve not altready signed the epetition Ban driven grouse shooting then please consider doing so here.  Send an email to your address book network and draw the issue to their attention if you’ve not already done so, the more who join in the stormy issue and ‘Thunderclap’ ….

As if no breeding Hen Harriers in England isn’t depressing enough we have another threat facing our natural resources, and no surprise it’s those owned by you and I i.e. the public!

HYDRAULIC FRACKING: A contentious business?

I’m sure I’m not the only person reading this blog post who will have received an email alert/appeal very similar to that below:

Today, David Cameron opened up huge new areas of the country to fracking. More than half of Britain is now up for grabs in the prime minister’s latest frack-a-thon, including areas in 10 national parks. 

But already, almost 250,000 people have signed our petition calling for David Cameron to keep the UK frack free. Can you help us hit 300,000 and show prime minister the strength of opposition he and his government are up against?  Readers can access and sign the petition here.

Despite the government claims that national parks will only be targeted for drilling in “exceptional circumstances”, today’s announcement is littered with loopholes – meaning the tranquillity of the Peak District, the Lake District and Brecon Beacons could still be shattered as fracking companies move in to drill.

Not only has the fracking industry still to prove it can operate safely, the oil and gas produced by fracking would increase our carbon emissions at a time when we need to be massively reducing them.

But there’s still time to stop the industry before it begins.  Last week, Cameron’s fracking juggernaut was forced off the road in West Sussex when the county council unanimously turned down an application to drill in the ancient village of Wisborough Green, just outside the South Downs National Park.

Nearly 2,500 people voiced their concerns about huge lorries thundering through country lanes. And on the day the application to drill was heard by council leaders, an expert geologist described the fracking company’s plan as “incompetent and disingenuous.”

The brakes might have been put on fracking in Wisborough Green for the time being, but the prime minister’s obsession with fracking has blinded him to the scale of opposition up and down the country. Remind him what he’s up against – sign the petition now to urge David Cameron to ditch fracking.

The email appeal uses emotive terminology and we would seek to understand both sides of the argument, so naturally we would expect that case to be accurate evidence based science.  The Guardian calls for the protection of National Parks but also our houses.  They also reported that Fracking push gets the go ahead, but there appears an expectation that we will trust politicians to safeguard National Parks, sounds like the time that the public let *politicians sort out their expenses scandal or when they bailed out the banks at the public expense or sold off public assets at less than market value?  However, ever an agnostic ….

In a tightening of the guidance, the government will ask energy firms to submit an environmental statement that is “particularly comprehensive and detailed” if they want to frack on or near protected countryside, forcing them to demonstrate their understanding of local sensitivities. It will make clear that the applications “should be refused in these areas other than in exceptional circumstances and in the public interest”.

In addition, Eric Pickles, the communities secretary, is likely to make a final decision on more appeals related to protected areas over the next 12 months, instead of leaving it to the planning watchdog.  [Read the full Guardian article here.]  Another excellent piece was that written by John Vidal when he called for Frack free zones to protect water and wildlife, see here.

Government will ‘ask’, …. firms will produce an environmental statement to demonstrate – that’s really reassuring isn’t it?   We all appreciate that we need an energy mix, that we need to conserve energy (perhaps someone should remind Government of ‘conservation’) but I suppose that doesn’t make the energy companies money does it if we reduce our consumption?  We need safe and reliable energy, we need energy companies to be accountable …. (see above*).

A useful start in terms of understanding the issue of Hydraulic fracturing can be found here.

If you are minded to consider signing the Greenpeace petition then it can be found here.

Updates & ‘moor’ ramblings

June 15, 2014

Readers might be interested in an event which is being run as part of a series of British Ecological Society Peatlands Special Interest Group workshops and in which the Forum have an involvement.

Sphagnum Mosses: Identification, Diversity, Landscape and Ecology.

The field visit is to Thorne Moors and the ‘basecamp’ is a community venue in Moorends.

Monday 20 October 2014 (9.30am – 4.30pm).

For more information access the information and Sphagnum booking form 2014 here.

See also In the bog conference details via UKEconet

‘Campaign corner’:

Conservation campaigning readers who also visit Standing up for Nature may share some of the frustration around the recent news released by Defra in respect of agri-industrialist welfare payments, sorry …. agricultural / environment support.  Even the BBC report that EU wildlife grants will be used to grow crops.  Another excellent and worthwhile read can be found on “a new nature blog”, in this substantive analysis Miles King explains why he considers that “The CAP no longer fits” and one might struggle to find much in the post to disagree with?  Absolutely astonishing, we shall be having nightmares …. a vista of thousand acre monocultures of peas and beans?  No hedgerows (so where do the pollinating insects build nests), no ponds, no diversity?  But agri-industrialists get their welfare grants, where are the challenges?  The main players in terms of membership numbers have been quite critical, but words come easy and there are many ‘politicians’ in some of the NGOs as there are making a mess of environmental scheme support.

Avery’s petition to Ban driven grouse shooting has passed its 4000 mark in a mere 18 days.  Can that magic 10,000 be reached to ensure that the topic is discussed in Parliament?  Please read Avery’s rationale and consider doing as he asks?

Another appeal which has recently visited my inbox has been that which informs us that:

Right next to Brecon Beacons National Park in South Wales, developers are planning to turn 830 acres of hillside into a 3.5 mile race track — into the Circuit of Wales motorsports complex.

The local council argues that 6,000 jobs will be created — but, as environmentalists point out, the park will certainly be affected by pollution and an expected 750,000 people visiting.

Should we support the campaigners seeking to ask the Welsh government to reconsider turning this pristine natural area into a race track?  If you believe that nature should be protected and a priority then here’s the link:

http://www.thepetitionsite.com/183/006/193/wales-reconsider-turning-830-acres-of-wildlife-into-a-race-track/

Nature notes:

Some nice moths have recently have visited the garden Actinic Heath trap but other methods can bring rewards too.  This rather snazzy beast was spending a lazy afternoon on a poplar leaf.  It morphs into a delightful adult, but the larvae are certainly worth the effort of searching out.  The White Satin Moth, which is what this will eventually turn into  is recorded from both Thorne & Hatfield Moors.

140615 WSM hrk 187


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Mark Avery

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a new nature blog

I write about politics, nature + the environment. Some posts are serious, some not. These are my views, I don't do any promotional stuff and these views are not being expressed for anyone who employs me.

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