Posts Tagged ‘Nightjars’

Interested in Nightjars, Moths, Myxomycetes & moorland management? An Invitation.

March 31, 2019

Friday 12 April 2019 will see the Forum’s Annual Meeting and, sad to say, that it will see Lucy Mitchell deliver her final installment from her Nightjar research on Thorne & Hatfield Moors.  This popular presentation, delivered by an amazingly dedicated ornithologist will report on the radio tagging of these enigmatic birds which breed on our local moorlands and the issues they face in terms of survival and the dynamics of this ‘northern’ outpost of the species.

Nightjar Chicks Ringed 280616 LR

Nightjar chicks, their cryptic camouflage can make them difficult to spot.  Image: Lucy Mitchell.    

Other talks include an update on the management works undertaken on Thorne & Hatfield Moors by Tim Kohler of Natural England and the impact this has had on the habitats and species of the peatlands.

There will also be a talk on recent discoveries made by local field naturalists, for example the amazing (re) discovery, 127 years to the day of Buckleria paludum aka the Sundew Plume moth that it was first discovered in Yorkshire by G T Porritt.  The discovery of Diacheopsis mitchellii, a minute myxomycete, previously known from just two sites (one in Japan and one in Sussex).

1493 Buckleria paludum (5) hrk DSCN3822 Crop.JPG

Buckleria paludum, a very small plume moth whose larvae survive eating Sundew plants.  Image: Helen R Kirk.

Diacheopsis mitchellii mw 23012019b.jpg

Diacheopsis mitchellii, a minute myxomycete found on Thorne Moors and, lacking a vernacular name was, in the interim nicknamed ‘Thorne Caviar’.  Image: Martin Warne.

The talks are open to the public, if you are interested then please contact execsec@thmcf.org for more details.

The talks will be followed by a light buffet lunch and the opportunity to grab some publication bargains and network with other interested naturalists and visitors.

Advertisements

Hidden landscapes, Dynamic habitats & Sphagnum?

March 20, 2018

Further to the previous blog post inviting people to the public presentations at our Annual Meeting on Friday 6 April, the Executive are pleased to provide the details of a third speaker.

ANNUAL MEETING

on Friday 6 April 2018
Moorends Miners Welfare & Community Development Centre, West Road, DN8 4LH

Doors open to the public lectures at 11.00

Lucy Ryan (University of York) “Dynamic habitat selection of the European Nightjar from a Thorne & Hatfield Moors perspective, latest updates”

Kieran Sheehan “The hunt for elusive Sphagnum species on Thorne Moors continues; an update”

Nika Shilobod (University of Plymouth)Rediscovering the ‘Wildscape’: Reconstructing Hidden Landscapes through a Case Study in the Humberhead Levels”.

Light buffet lunch

Please make use of the lunch time to network and to pick up publication bargains. The Centre has been booked until 3pm so people will be able to network amongst themselves.

There is no charge for the talks but a donation in lieu for refreshments and light buffet lunch will be used towards the purchase of more research equipment (particularly the tags needed to track the nightjar activity).

To help with the administrative aspects of the day please book a place for the public lectures and lunch by contacting execsec@thmcf.org or write to T&HMCF, P O Box 879, Thorne, Doncaster, DN8 5WU

Annual Meeting 2018 : An invitation

March 13, 2018

The Executive are pleased to announce that following the formal proceedings of our Annual Meeting on Friday 6 April 2018 members of the public are invited to two talks.

Come and learn about the enigmatic nightjars of the Humberhead Levels and discover how many of the 34 species Sphagnum found in the UK can be found on Thorne Moors.

Doors open to the public lectures at 11.00 for interested visitors.

Nightjar Chicks Ringed 280616 web

Lucy Ryan (University of York) “Dynamic habitat selection of the European Nightjar from a Thorne & Hatfield Moors perspective, latest updates”  and

Kieran Sheehan “The hunt for elusive Sphagnum species on Thorne Moors continues; an update” 

Sphagnum squarrosum 958 web (2)

The event is being held at Moorends Miners Welfare and Community Development Centre, West Road, Moorends, Thorne, DN8 4LH.

Visitors are encouraged to make use of the lunch time to network and to pick up publication bargains. The Centre has been booked until 3pm so people will be able to network amongst themselves.

 To help with the administrative aspects of the day booking is essential so please contact execsec@thmcf.org or write to T&HMCF, P O Box 879, Thorne, Doncaster, DN8 5WU

There is no charge for the talks but a donation in lieu for refreshments and light buffet lunch will be used towards the purchase of more research equipment (particularly the tags needed to track the nightjar activity).

Images: H R Kirk

Join us for Bog birds, bugs & drainage matters?

March 6, 2016

A reminder to readers living with reasonable traveling distance of Thorne & Hatfield Moors, that we are holding our Annual Meeting on ‘All Fool’s Day’* which includes two excellent lectures which are open to the public and after which a site visit onto Thorne Moors via a historic landscape feature – one of the last remaining ‘Cables’

“Bog birds and bugs” is the title of a talk to be given by Lucy Ryan, a masters student at York University who is undertaking monitoring of the nightjar population on Thorne and Hatfield Moors. This three year study will look at the impact the management works undertaken by Natural England through their EU LIFE+ Project.

A second talk “Who started the drainage?  Iron Age & Roman Landscapes in the Humberhead Levels” is to be given by Dr Paul C Buckland, whose early work included investigation on the Bronze Age trackway on Thorne Moors.

Following on from these talks there is to be a site visit, weather permitting onto Thorne Moors to look at some of the recent management works undertaken to implement a Water Level Management Plan on the site as well as delivering scrub clearance through the LIFE+ Project.   That’s Life – Restoring the Humberhead Peatlands.  An interesting image to accompany a press release about peatlands?

The visit and the talks are open to the public and are an opportunity for local people to learn about the works currently underway on their moors. Please contact the execsec@thmcf.org for more details.

Given that it is 1 April, then there is every chance we will see and hear signs of spring.  Observations so far indicate an early season, with Chiffchaff recorded on 23 February and  up to 14 adders have been recorded on Thorne Moors on one day.

To help with the administrative aspects of the day, please book a place for the public lecture, lunch and site visit by contacting execsec@thmcf.org

Adder Hibernacula 03032016-1

Two female adders soaking up the sun.  Image: Martin Warne.

*All Fool’s Day: 1st April.


BIRDING SITE GUIDE - Birding Site Guide

Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?

Hatfield Moors Birding Blog

Bird and other wildlife information service for Hatfield Moors, South Yorkshire, UK © HMBSG 17/11/2010

Mark Avery

Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?

a new nature blog

I write about politics, nature + the environment. Some posts are serious, some not. These are my views, I don't do any promotional stuff and these views are not being expressed for anyone who employs me.

UK and Ireland Natural History Bloggers

Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?